Posts

  • KDE Itinerary - Barcodes

    While discussing data extraction methods for KItinerary earlier I briefly mentioned barcodes as one source of information. It’s a subject that deserves a few more details though, as it’s generally good to know what information you are sharing when your ticket barcode gets scanned.

  • Bringing KContacts and KCalCore to KDE Frameworks

    Earlier this month I headed to Toulouse for some excellent food, KDE Itinerary field testing, and of course the yearly KDE PIM sprint. David has already written about some of the things we did there, here I’ll cover the tasks I focussed on during the sprint: upstreaming the KContacts vCard framework and the KCalCore iCalendar framework to KDE Frameworks.

  • Automatically finding and fixing insecure HTTP links

    End of last month I attended the KDE privacy goal sprint in Leipzig. Together with Sandro I continued to look into tooling for identifying and fixing insecure HTTP links, an issue I have written about earlier already. The result of this can be found in D19996.

  • February/March in KDE Itinerary

    It’s time again for another update on what has recently happened around KDE Itinerary. Together with the last two month summary this also covers the changes of the extraction engine and the KMail integration that will be part of the 19.04 application releases.

  • KDE Itinerary - Using Public Transport Data

    Now that we have a way to access realtime public transport data this needs to be integrated into KDE Itinerary. There’s three use-cases being looked at so far, described below.

  • Introducing KPublicTransport

    One of the larger missing pieces for KDE Itinerary is access to dynamic data for your current mode of transport. That is delays or other service interruptions, gate or platform changes, or finding a specific connection for e.g. an unbound train booking. At least for ground-based public transport we have been making some progress on this in the last few months, resulting in a new library, KPublicTransport.

  • Opening Files with Qt on Android

    After addressing Android support in KF5Notifications another fairly generic task that so far required Android specific code is next: opening files. Due to the security isolation of apps and the way the native “file dialog” works on Android this is quite different from other platforms, which makes application code a bit ugly. This can be fixed in Qt though.

  • FOSDEM 2019 and Plasma Mobile Sprint

    Last weekend I attended FOSDEM 2019 in Brussels, and following that I stopped by the Plasma Mobile sprint while that was in town.

  • December/January in KDE Itinerary

    It’s time again for another update on what has recently happened around KDE Itinerary. Since the last two month summary we had the KDE Applications 18.12 release, so most of the following developments will be for the April release.

  • KF5 Android Notification Backend

    With the ongoing work on realtime data access in KDE Itinerary we need a way show notifications in case of delays or other trip changes. That’s what KF5Notifications is for, which unfortunately isn’t supported on Android yet. Since an Android specific code path in KDE Itinerary for that would be quite ugly, I did look into adding Android support for KF5Notifications. How hard can it be? ;)

  • Finding insecure network connections

    One obvious aspect of KDE’s privacy goal is eliminating all network connections that are not using transport encryption. That’s however not as straightforward to ensure as it may sound, it’s easy to have a long forgotten HTTP link in a rarely used dialog that should have been changed to HTTPS many years ago already. How do we find all these cases?

  • October/November in KDE Itinerary

    It’s already two month since I last wrote a summary on recent developments in KDE Itinerary, so here is what happened in October and November. With the 18.12 application release coming up shortly, that’s also largely what you can expect in there.

  • KDE Itinerary - Last week in France

    A week ago Benjamin Port presented our work around KDE Itinerary at Capitole de Libre in Toulouse, and Thursday I did the same at the Paris Open Transport Meetup. Here’s some of the feedback we got.

  • KDE Itinerary @ Paris Open Transport Meetup

    I have been invited by Kisio Digital to present the work we have been doing around KDE Itinerary at the Paris Open Transport Meetup next week. The meetup is near Gare de Lyon and starts on Thursday at 19:00. Feel free to come by, I’m looking forward to discuss ideas on how to move KDE Itinerary forward.

  • Automatic C++ comparison operators

    C++ comparison operators are usually fairly straightforward to implement. Writing them by hand can however be quite error prone if there are many member variables to consider. Missing a single one of them will still compile and mostly work fine, apart from some hard to debug corner cases, such as misbehaving or crashing algorithms and containers, or data loss. Can we do better?

  • KDE Frameworks 5 for Yocto

    At the KDE booth at Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Edinburgh the other week you might have seen the Plasma Mobile shell running on a Raspberry Pi 3, similar to what I presented at Akademy in Vienna. Besides showing the flexibility of Plasma and how nicely the Plasma Mobile shell works on touch screens, this was originally built as a demonstration of the KDE Frameworks 5 Yocto recipes.

  • KF5 Static Builds

    Static linking has long gone out of fashion, at least on the average Linux desktop distribution. There are however good reasons to still (or again) support this for our frameworks. One is the rise of application bundles (Flatpak, Android APK, AppImage, etc).

  • August/September in KDE Itinerary

    Since KDE Itinerary was first presented to a wider audience at Akademy 2018 a lot has happened. Here are the most important changes from the past two month, in KDE Itinerary and the underlying frameworks.

  • KDE Itinerary - Static Knowledge

    In the previous post on writing custom data extractors for the KItinerary framework, I mentioned we are augmenting extracted data with knowledge from Wikidata. This post will cover this aspect in more detail.

  • KDE Itinerary - Writing Custom Extractors

    Following the look at how KDE Itinerary does data extraction, this post will cover custom data extractors in a bit more detail. Custom extractors are needed where we are unable to obtain the information we are interested in from structured annotations, or add information to incomplete structured data (such as boarding pass barcodes).

  • KDE Itinerary - Data Extraction

    After the overview of KDE’s travel assistant components we are going to look at one part in particular here, the booking data extraction. The convenience and usefulness of the overall system depends on being fed with accurate and complete data of when and where you are going to travel, ideally fully automatically.

  • KDE Itinerary - Overview

    As introduced in the previous post there has been some work going on to explore a privacy-by-design alternative to digital travel assitant services like provided by Google or TripIt.

  • KDE Itinerary - How did we get here?

    At Akademy I’ve presented the current state of KDE Itinerary. Due to popular demand and since 25 minutes aren’t a whole lot of time I’ll try to write a few posts on this subject here too, beginning with how this all started.